8
ANNEXES
NON-FINANCIAL REPORT 2019

About the Report

General Information

Energoatom Non-Financial Report 2019 (the Report) has been prepared on a voluntary basis and intended for a wide range of the Company’s stakeholders: central and local government authorities, employees, contractors, international partners, non-governmental organisations, mass media, and others. The Report discloses the Company’s non-financial and key financial data that give a comprehensive picture of the Company’s operations. Considering that Energoatom works to enhance its openness and transparency, the Report discloses information about the Company’s strategy, CSR and sustainable development principles, key financial, environmental, and production indicators, impacts from production, and stakeholder engagement.

The Report has been prepared in line with:

  • Global Reporting Initiative standards (Core)
  • UN Global Compact 10 Principles
  • АА1000 International Stakeholder Engagement Standard (Institute of Social and Ethical AccountAbility)
  • ISO 26000: 2010 Guidance on Social Responsibility
  • UN Sustainable Development Goals 2030.

Since 2017, Energoatom has disclosed its contribution to the achievement of the UN Sustainable Development Goals in the Report. We have followed this approach this year as well. Energoatom strives to ensure that the Company’s development strategy is linked to the objectives for achieving the UN SDGs in addressing environmental, social and economic issues, as can be seen in the Report. In 2019, the Company prioritised SDGs where it could make the biggest contribution: 7, 8, 9, 11, and 13. When prioritising the Sustainable Development Goals, we focused on the beacons that matched our sector profile and strategy, as well as the interests of our stakeholders most of all.

Statement of Limitation of Liability for Publication of Projection Data

The Report contains the information on the Company’s plans and initiatives for a medium and long term. The plans are projections, and their implementation depends, among other things, on a number of factors beyond the Company’s control (political and economic situation inside and outside Ukraine, changes in legislation, etc.). Thus, the actual performance in future periods can vary from the projections.


Report Structure

The Report gives a description of the Company’s operations and performance in the following areas:

  • Corporate governance
  • Corporate ethics and anti-corruption actions
  • Transparency and accountability
  • Sustainable development
  • Investment activities
  • Safety culture improvements
  • Environmental protection and energy efficiency
  • HR management
  • Development of local communities
  • Stakeholder engagement.

Scope of the Report

The scope of the Report is consistent with the annual reporting cycle. The previous report was published in 2019. This Report covers Energoatom’s operations from 1 January 2019 through 31 December 2019. The document may mention events occurring before or after this period when they give readers better understanding of the information disclosed in the Report. It discloses key data about the economic, environmental, and social performance of Energoatom and its separate subdivisions:

  • Zaporizhzhya NPP
  • Rivne NPP
  • South-Ukraine NPP
  • Khmelnytska NPP
  • Energoatom-Trading
  • AtomRemontService
  • Atomkomplekt
  • Scientific and Technical Center
  • Atomenergomash
  • Automation & Engineering
  • Emergency and Technical Center
  • Atomprojectengineering
  • Skladske Gospodarstvo
  • Atomprylad
  • Upravlinnia Spravamy
  • Representative Office in Brussels


Principles for Defining Report Content

The Company has followed GRI recommendations in terms of defining the content of the Report. Annex 3 contains GRI Content Index. Energoatom strives to improve procedures for evaluation and selection of material aspects.

In this Report, there is no significant restatement of indicators and data for past periods disclosed in previous reports. The reliability of the data disclosed in the Report is ensured during the collection and consolidation of information in line with standard procedures and is confirmed by units responsible for the preparation of relevant information.

The following GRI principles ensure the quality of the Report:

  • Balance
  • Comparability
  • Accuracy
  • Clarity
  • Reliability
  • Timeliness.


Material Aspects

In an effort to identify material aspects, the Company:

  • made a list of possible material aspects related to the nature of the Company’s operations;
  • benchmarked the materiality of aspects disclosed in this Report against reports of leading international energy companies;
  • analysed the media landscape and monitored documents regulating different aspects of the Company’s operations;
  • conducted interviews with representatives of the Company’s key subdivisions;
  • consolidated requests and enquiries sent by civil society organisations to the corporate email.

Following these efforts, the Company made a list of material aspects (please see the Materiality Matrix).

Material Aspects

  • 1) Nuclear, radiation, and environmental safety
  • 2) Environmental footprint minimisation
  • 3) Improvement of employee’s well-being and safety at work
  • 4) Corporate governance
  • 5) Dialogue with stakeholders
  • 6) Contribution to the social and economic development of Ukraine
  • 7) Compliance with national and international laws
  • 8) Transparency and accountability
  • 9) Minimisation of negative environmental consequences
  • 10) Competitive salaries and social benefits for employees

  • 11) Professional development of employees
  • 12) Safe working conditions
  • 13) Business ethics and fight against corruption
  • 14) Reliable electricity supply
  • 15) Human rights
  • 16) Charity
  • 17) Improvement of the standards of living in the areas of the Company’s operations
  • 18) Development of local communities
  • 19) Energy efficiency
  • 20) Fight against climate change

Key Terms, References and Abbreviations

ARSMS (Automated Radiation Situation Monitoring System) is a system of technical facilities designed for providing permanent automated radiological and meteorological monitoring at the industrial site, buffer zone, and supervised area in all NPP operating modes (normal operation, design-basis and beyond design-basis accidents, and decommissioning activities).

Nuclear power industry is a branch of energy sector that uses nuclear power for electricity and heat generation.

VVER-1000 is a water-cooled energetic reactor with pressurised water as heat carrier and decelerator. A power unit has 1,000 MW of electric power capacity and 3,000 MW of thermal power capacity.

VVER-440 is a water-called energetic reactor with 440 MW of electric power capacity and 1,375 MW of thermal power capacity.

RES (renewable energy sources) are practically inexhaustible energy resources from natural sources (sun, wind, rivers, organic matter, etc.).

Radioactive release is a radionuclide emission into the atmosphere, resulting from operation of process facilities and ventilation systems.

SF (spent fuel) is a special type of radioactive nuclear fuel, which is the spent (irradiated) nuclear fuel for NPPs.

UN Global Compact (UN GC) is a strategic policy initiative for businesses that are committed to aligning with ten universally accepted principles for human rights, labour, environment, and anticorruption to build environmentally friendly and integrated economies.

State Nuclear Regulatory Inspectorate of Ukraine is a central executive governmental agency accountable to the Cabinet of Ministers of Ukraine. The agency is responsible for shaping and implementing the public policy in the area of safe use of nuclear power.

Energy efficiency means the rational use of energy resources, achievement of economically feasible and efficient use of existing fuel and energy resources at the current level of technological development and in compliance with environmental regulations.

EBRD (European Bank for Reconstruction and Development) is an international financial and credit institution that provides assistance to countries from Central Europe to Central Asia in market reforms and extensive integration of these economies into the international economic relations.

Euratom (European Atomic Energy Community) contributes to development and research of nuclear energy, creation of the common nuclear fuel market, control over nuclear facilities, and the development of the peaceful uses of nuclear technologies in line with uniform safety standards.

Ionising radiation means any type of particle or electromagnetic radiation that has the potential to excite an atom or molecule through direct or indirect interactions.

Instrument for Nuclear Safety Cooperation (INSC) is a nuclear safety cooperation programme that has been implemented by the EU since 2007 instead of TACIS programme of the European Commission (1992-2006) that was in effect in Ukraine and a number of other independent states at that time.

NPP capacity utilisation factor is an important characteristic of the NPP operational efficiency. It presents a ratio of actual power output for a specific time to a power output that could be reached at the installed capacity for this time interval.

Availability factor of a nuclear power unit is an indicator showing the ability of a power unit to have a nominal load. It is used as part of measures to improve the reliability of electricity production, as it demonstrates how well nuclear power plants are operated, maintained and repaired.

Complex (Consolidated) Safety Upgrade Programme of Power Units of Ukrainian NPPs (CCSUP) is a programme for improving safety at Ukrainian NPPs, which was approved by Resolution No. 1270 adopted by the Cabinet of Ministers of Ukraine on 7 December 2011. CCSUP seeks to make further improvements to safety as part of the implementation of longterm strategy for enhancement of safety of Energoatom’s power units.

Compliance policy consolidates elements of corporate culture and organisational structure, rules and procedures that are in line with the Company’s internal regulations, national legislation and international requirements and ensure compliance of the Company’s employees irrespective of their job position.

Reference levels (control limits) mean the 1st category radiation and hygiene levels with values established on the basis of normal radiation exposure actually reached at a particular nuclear facility or territory.

Safety culture is a set of characteristics and attitudes in organisations and behaviour of individuals that establishes that safety issues at NPPs are an overriding priority and are addressed according to their significance.

IAEA (the International Atomic Energy Agency) is an international organisation that seeks to promote the peaceful uses of nuclear energy.

The National Commission for State Regulation of Energy and Public Utilities is an independent collective government agency responsible for government regulation, monitoring and control over business entities in the energy and utilities sectors.

Full reservoir level is a design level of full reservoir, which limits the live storage capacity from the top.

EIA (Environmental Impact Assessment) is a new modern European approach to environmental impact assessment. EU Member States are obliged to conduct EIA before permits are issued for any big project that may have a negative environmental footprint.

Paris Agreement is an agreement within the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) to enhance global response to climate change in the context of sustainability and poverty elimination efforts. The agreement took effect on 4 November 2016.

A greenhouse gas (GHG) is a gas that absorbs heat energy emitted from Earth’s surface and clouds and re-radiates it back to the Earth. The primary greenhouse gases in Earth’s atmosphere are water vapour (H2O), carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), ozone (O3), sulphur hexafluoride (SF6), hydrofluorocarbons (HFC), and perfluorocarbons (PFC).

RAW treatment involves technological processes that intend to change the properties and/or the physical and chemical composition of radioactive waste and produce a waste package suitable for handling, transportation, storage, and/or burial.

RAW management is a general term that combines all types of operations associated with processing, conditioning, transportation, storage, disposal, and/or burial of radioactive waste.

Post-Fukushima measures involve actions under the Complex (Consolidated) Safety Upgrade Programme of Power Units of Ukrainian NPPs that have been developed following a deep priority safety assessment of Ukrainian NPPs (stress tests). Such stress tests were carried out at European NPPs after the accident at Fukushima NPP to prevent serious accidents and improve serious accident management.

Radioactive waste (RAW) means radioactive nuclear materials and substances that cannot be used any longer.

Radiation safety means the compliance with the radiation exposure limits prescribed by safety regulations, rules, and standards for the staff, population, and the environment.

Sustainable use of natural resources means the use of natural resources to the extent and in a way that ensure sustainable economic development, harmonised interaction between the society and natural environment, efficient use of natural resources potential, and economic mechanisms for environmentally friendly use of nature.

Carcinogenic risk assessment is a public health risk assessment for air pollution impacts. The assessment is based on non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic risk calculations. The risk is assessed individually for every carcinogen and for several carcinogenic air pollutants.

Non-carcinogenic risk assessment is a public health risk assessment for air pollution impacts. The non-carcinogenic risk assessment is based on non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic risk calculations using hazard index.

Emergency Preparedness and Response System (EPRS) is a system of interconnected technical means and resources, organisational, technical and radiation prevention activities undertaken by an operating organisation to ensure emergency preparedness and response: prevention or mitigation of radiation impact on the staff, population and the environment in case of an accident at NPPs, as well as in case of an emergency caused by such accident.

Company standard is a standard adopted by a standardisation entity, which is lower than a national standardisation authority, on the basis of production, R&D, commercial and other common interests.

NPP social infrastructure includes cultural, sports, and recreational facilities that are open for families of NPP employees and local residents.

Sustainable energy means energy produced and used in ways that support human development over the long term in all of its social, economic, and environmental dimensions. The definition was given at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) also known as the Rio de Janeiro Earth Summit (1992).

Global Reporting Initiative Standards (GRI Standards) are the most widely adopted global system of economic, environmental, and social reporting.

Dry spent fuel storage facility is a site or installation for dry storage of spent fuel.

Fresh nuclear fuel is a new or non-irradiated fuel, including fuel produced out of fissionable material manufactured out of irradiated fuel.

Fuel assembly (FA) means nuclear fuel, which is a structured group of fissionable material used to generate thermal power in a nuclear reactor through controlled nuclear reaction.

CCS (carbon capture and storage) is a technology that enables the capture of CO2 from industrial and energy generating processes, the transport of CO2, and its long-term storage underground, isolated from the air.

Physical protection means activities in the area of use of nuclear power that are undertaken to protect nuclear facilities, nuclear materials, radioactive waste, and other sources of ionising radiation and to strengthen the nuclear weapon non-proliferation.

Civil defence is a government’s function to protect population, territories, the environment, and property from accidents by preventing emergencies, cleaning up accident consequences and providing help to the victims during peacetime and also in extraordinary times.

UN Sustainable Development Goals (UN SDGs) are future global development targets adopted by the United Nations. Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) replaced the Millennium Development Goals in late 2015 when MDGs expired.

Central Spent Fuel Storage Facility (CSFSF) is an interim storage facility which is to be built at the site of the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone to store spent nuclear fuel from Rivne, South-Ukraine, and Khmelnytska NPPs.

АА1000 are standards designed to measure the performance of a company and provide procedures and criteria for social and ethical auditing of company’s operations. The main difference between this approach and other standards is the introduction of the ongoing dialogue with stakeholders into the company’s daily practices.

ENTSO-E is the European Network of Transmission System Operators for Electricity.

EUR (European Utility Requirement) is an international group established by European organisations that brings together 18 leading European energy generating companies operating over 130 power units with light water reactors. The organisation seeks to develop technical requirements for designs of new Generation III/III+ LWR nuclear power plants to ensure further development of nuclear industry in Europe.

IFNEC (International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation), formerly known as the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), began as a U.S. proposal announced by United States Secretary of Energy Samuel Bodman on 6 February 2006 to build an international partnership to promote the use of nuclear power and close the nuclear fuel cycle in a way that reduces nuclear waste and the risk of nuclear weapon proliferation.

INES (International Nuclear Event Scale) was developed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to rate nuclear accidents. Since 1990, the scale has been applied to classify accidents associated with emergency radioactive emissions from nuclear power plants, then extended to all installations associated with the civil nuclear industry.

INPRO (The International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles) was established in 2000 to help ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute to meeting the energy needs of the 21st century in a sustainable manner.

ISO 14001 is an international standard that specifies requirements for an environmental management system that an organisation can use to enhance its environmental performance.

KPIs (key performance indicators) mean a financial and non-financial evaluation system to navigate organisations towards achievement of strategic goals.

NEA/OECD (Nuclear Energy Agency) is a specialised international agency within the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) that promotes peaceful and rational uses of nuclear energy.

OHSAS 18001 is an international occupational health and safety management system standard. OHSAS 18001 helps create healthy and safe working conditions.

ProZorro is a systemwide reform of public e-procurements in Ukraine.

STEM education is a sequence of courses or programmes of study that train students for successful employment, post-secondary education or both and requires different and more technically sophisticated skills including the application of mathematics and science skills and concepts. STEM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics.

Endnotes

1. Donuzlavska wind power plant is located in the temporarily occupied territory of the Crimea.

2. Energoatom Strategic Development Plan 2020-2024 is available at http://www.energoatom.com.ua/uploads/2020/sp_2020_2024.pdf

3. Ukraine Energy Strategy 2035 Safety, Energy Efficiency, Competitiveness is available at www.kmu.gov.ua/control/uk/cardnpd?docid=250250456

4. In October 2019, the Ministry of Energy and Coal Industry and the Ministry of Environmental Protection were reorganised into the Ministry of Energy and Environmental Protection of Ukraine.

5. For more information about Energoatom Code of Corporate Ethics, please go to www.atom.gov.ua

6. For more information about Energoatom Anti-Corruption Programme, please go to www.atom.gov.ua

7. For more information about Energoatom Compliance Policy, please go to www.atom.gov.ua

8. For more information about the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), please go to https://www.iaea.org

9. For more information about the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), please go to http://www.ebrd.com/ukraine.html

10. For more information about OPIC, please go to https://www.opic.gov

11. For more information about the European Commission, please go to https://ec.europa.eu

12. For more information about the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom), please go to https://ec.europa.eu/programmes/horizon2020/en/h2020

13. For more information about European Utility Requirements (EUR), please go to http://www.europeanutilityrequirements.org

14. Energoatom Management Report 2018 is available at www.atom.gov.ua/ua/actvts-16/zvit_pro_upravlinna-214

15. Energoatom Management Report 2019 is available at http://www.energoatom.com.ua/uploads/2020/web_EA_19_s.pdf

16. Energoatom Non-Financial Report 2018 is available at http://nfr2018.energoatom.kiev.ua/download/nfr_EA_2018_UA.pdf

17. For a detailed list of social benefits provided to the Company’s employees, please read Energoatom Non-Financial Report 2016 at www.atom.gov.ua/ua/actvts-16/sustainable_development-98/non_financial_reporting-99/p/nefinansovij_zvit_naek_energoatom_za_2016_rik-3749

GRI CONTENT INDEX

General Reporting Element Indicator Report Section Correspondence between GRI Standards and UN SDGs
GRI 102: General disclosures
Organization Profile
GRI 102-1 Name of the organisation Energoatom
GRI 102-2 Brands, products, and services 2. Practising Effective Governance
2.1. Company’s Development Strategy
GRI 102-3 Location of headquarters 8. Annexes
8.6. Contacts
GRI 102-4 Location of operations 2. Practising Effective Governance
2.1. Energoatom Development Strategy
GRI 102-5 Ownership and legal form 2. Practising Effective Governance
2.2. Management System and Structure
GRI 102-6 Markets served 2. Practising Effective Governance
2.1. Energoatom Development Strategy
GRI 102-7 Scale of the organization Energoatom's performance in numbers
GRI 102-8 Information on employees and other workers 7. Investing in People
7.1. Management Principles
8. ANNEXES
8.4. Key Performance Indicators 2017-2019
GRI 102-9 Supply chain 2. Practising Effective Governance
2.4. Procurement Management
GRI 102-10 Significant changes to the organization and its supply chain No changes in the reporting period
GRI 102-12 External initiatives 2. Practising Effective Governance
2.5. International Cooperation
GRI 102-13 Membership of associations (a list of the main memberships of industry or other associations, and national or international advocacy organizations) 2. Practising Effective Governance
2.5. International Cooperation
Strategy
GRI 102-14 A statement from the most senior decision-maker of the organization about the relevance of sustainability to the organization and its strategy for addressing sustainability Address by Energoatom Acting President
Ethics and integrity
GRI 102-16 Values, principles, standards, and norms of behavior in the organization 2. Practising Effective Governance
2.3. Compliance Policy and Business Ethics
Corporate Governance
GRI 102-18 Governance structure of the organization Company Structure
2. Practising Effective Governance
2.2. Management System and Structure
GRI 102-20 Executive-level responsibility for economic, environmental, and social topics 2. Practising Effective Governance
2.2. Management System and Structure
GRI 102-21 Consulting stakeholders on economic, environmental, and social topics For more, please see Energoatom Non-Financial Report 2018 (Environmental Programmes and Initiatives subsection, Clean Environment section)
GRI 102-22 Composition of the highest governance body and its committees Company Structure
2. Practising Effective Governance
2.2. Management System and Structure
GRI 102-23 Whether the chair of the highest governance body is also an executive officer in the organization The chair of the highest governance body is not also an executive officer
Stakeholder Engagement
GRI 102-40 List of stakeholder groups 3. Ensuring Sustainable Development
3.4. Stakeholder Engagement
8. Annexes
8.1 About the Report
GRI 102-41 Collective bargaining agreements 7. Investing in People
7.1. Management Principles
GRI 102-43 Approach to stakeholder engagement 3. Ensuring Sustainable Development
3.4. Stakeholder Engagement
Reporting practice
GRI 102-45 Entities included in the consolidated financial statements 8. Annexes
8.1. About the Report
GRI 102-46 Defining Report content and topic boundaries 8. Annexes
8.1. About the Report
GRI 102-47 List of material topics 8. Annexes
8.1. About the Report
GRI 102-48 Restatements of information No restatement of information in the reporting period
8. Annexes
8.1. About the Report
GRI 102-49 Significant changes from previous reporting periods in the list of material topics and topic boundaries No changes in the list of material topics in the reporting period
GRI 102-50 Reporting period 8. Annexes
8.1. About the Report
GRI 102-51 Date of most recent report 8. Annexes
8.1. About the Report
GRI 102-52 Reporting cycle 8. Annexes
8.1. About the Report
GRI 102-53 Contact point for questions regarding the report 8. Annexes
8.6. Contacts
GRI 102-54 Claims of reporting in accordance with the GRI Standards 8. Annexes
8.1. About the Report
GRI 102-55 GRI Content Index 8. Annexes
8.3. GRI Content Index
GRI 102-56 External assurance The Report had no external assurance
GRI 200: Economic topics
GRI 201: Economic performance
GRI 201-1 Direct economic value generated and distributed Energoatom’s Performance in Numbers
GRI 203: Indirect economic impacts
GRI 103-2 The management approach and its components 7. Investing in People
7.1. Management Principles
GRI 203-1 Infrastructure investments and services supported 7. Investing in People
7.1. Management Principles
GRI 203-2 Significant indirect economic impacts 7. Investing in People
7.4 Developing Local Communities
GRI 204: Procurement practices
GRI 103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its boundaries 2. Practising Effective Governance
2.4. Procurement Management
GRI 103-2 The management approach and its components 2. Practising Effective Governance
2.4. Procurement Management
GRI 204-1 Proportion of spending on local suppliers The Company keeps no centralised records of procurements from local suppliers
GRI 300: Environmental topics
GRI 302: Energy
GRI 103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its boundaries 6. Caring for Environment
6.4. Energy Management
GRI 103-2 The management approach and its components 6. Caring for Environment
6.4. Energy Management
GRI 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization 6. Caring for Environment
6.4. Energy Management
GRI 302-4 Reduction of energy consumption 6. Caring for Environment
6.4. Energy Management
GRI 303: Water
GRI 303-3 Water withdrawal 6. Caring for Environment
6.3. Environmental Performance
8. Annexes
8.4. Key Performance Indicators 2017-2019
GRI 303-4 Water discharge 6. Caring for Environment
6.3. Environmental Performance
GRI 303-5 Total water consumption 6. Caring for Environment
6.3. Environmental Performance
GRI 304: Biodiversity
GRI 103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its boundaries For more about the Company’s land preservation policy, please see Energoatom Non- Financial Report 2016 (Land Reclamation subsection, Environmental Responsibility section)
GRI 103-2 The management approach and its components
GRI 304-2 Significant impacts of activities, products, and services on biodiversity
GRI 304-4 Total number of IUCN Red List species and national conservation list species with habitats in areas affected by the operations of the organization, by level of extinction risk 6. Caring for Environment
6.3. Environmental Performance
GRI 305: Emissions
GRI 103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its boundaries 6. Caring for Environment
6.3. Environmental Performance
GRI 103-2 The management approach and its components 6. Caring for Environment
6.3. Environmental Performance
GRI 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions 8. Annexes
8.4. Key Performance Indicators 2017-2019
GRI 305-6 Emissions of ozone-depleting substances (ODS) 8. Annexes
8.4. Key Performance Indicators 2017-2019
GRI 305-7 Nitrogen oxides (NOX), sulfur oxides (SOX), and other significant air emissions 8. Annexes
8.4. Key Performance Indicators 2017-2019
GRI 306: Effluents and waste
GRI 103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its boundaries For more, please see Energoatom Non-Financial Report 2018 (Environmental Footprint subsection, Clean Environment section)
GRI 103-2 The management approach and its components 6. Caring for Environment
6.3. Environmental Performance
GRI 306-1 Water discharge by quality and destination 8. Annexes
8.4. Key Performance Indicators 2017-2019
GRI 306-2 Total weight of hazardous waste by type and disposal method 6. Caring for Environment
6.3. Environmental Performance
GRI 307: Environmental Compliance
GRI 307-1 Total monetary value of significant fines and nonmonetary sanctions for noncompliance with environmental laws 6. Caring for Environment
6.1. Management Principles
GRI 400: Social topics
GRI 401: Employment
GRI 401-2 Benefits provided to fulltime employees that are not provided to temporary or part-time employees 7. Investing in People
7.1. Management Principles
GRI 402: Labor/Management Relations
GRI 402-1 Minimum notice periods regarding operational changes and whether they are indicated in collective bargaining agreements 7. Investing in People
7.1. Management Principles
GRI 403: Occupational Health and Safety
GRI 103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its boundaries 5. Enhancing Safety Culture
5.4. Occupational H&S and Fire Safety
GRI 103-2 The management approach and its components 5. Enhancing Safety Culture
5.4. Occupational H&S and Fire Safety
GRI 403-2 Hazard identification, risk assessment, and incident investigation 5. Enhancing Safety Culture
5.4. Occupational H&S and Fire Safety
GRI 403-5 Worker training on occupational health and safety 5. Enhancing Safety Culture
5.4. Occupational H&S and Fire Safety
GRI 403-6 Promotion of worker health 7. Investing in People
7.1. Management Principles
GRI 403-9 Work-related injuries 5. Enhancing Safety Culture
5.4. Occupational H&S and Fire Safety
8. Annexes
8.4. Key Performance Indicators 2017-2019
GRI 404: Training and education
GRI 103-2 The management approach and its components 7. Investing in People
7.2. Employee Development and Training
GRI 404-1 Average hours of training per year per employee 7. Investing in People
7.2. Employee Development and Training
8. Annexes
8.4. Key Performance Indicators 2017-2019
GRI 404-2 Programs for upgrading employee skills and transition assistance programs 7. Investing in People
7.2. Employee Development and Training
8. Annexes
8.4. Key Performance Indicators 2017-2019
GRI 405: Diversity and equal opportunities
GRI 405-1 Diversity of governance bodies and employees with the breakdown by gender, age group, minority or other indicators of diversity 8. Annexes
8.4. Key Performance Indicators 2017-2019
7. Investing in People
7.1. Management Principles
GRI 406: Non-discrimination
GRI 406-1 Incidents of discrimination and corrective actions taken No discrimination incidents registered
GRI 408: Child labor
GRI 408-1 Operations and suppliers at significant risk for incidents of child labor and measures taken by the organization in the reporting period intended to contribute to the effective abolition of child labor Irrelevant. Pursuant to applicable laws of Ukraine, child labor and forced labor are prohibited. The Company has no operations in countries at significant risk of human rights violations, including, without limitation to, child labor or forced labor.
GRI 409: Forced or compulsory labor
GRI 409-1 Operations and suppliers at significant risk for incidents of forced or compulsory labor and measures taken by the organization in the reporting period intended to contribute to the effective abolition of forced or compulsory labor Irrelevant. Pursuant to applicable laws of Ukraine, child labor and forced labor are prohibited. The Company has no operations in countries at significant risk of human rights violations, including, without limitation to, child labor or forced labor.
GRI 411: Rights of indigenous peoples
GRI 411-1 Incidents of violations involving rights of indigenous peoples and remediation measures taken Irrelevant to the Company
GRI 413: Local communities
GRI 103-2 The management approach and its components 7. Investing in People
7.4. Developing Local Communities
GRI 413-1 Percentage of operations with implemented local community engagement, impact assessments, and development programs 7. Investing in People
7.4. Developing Local Communities
GRI 413-2 Operations with significant actual and potential negative impacts on local communities 7. Investing in People
7.4. Developing Local Communities
GRI 419: Socioeconomic compliance
GRI 419-1 Monetary value of significant fines for non-compliance with laws and regulations in the social and economic area No significant fines in the reporting period

Key Performance Indicators 2017-2019

Personnel
Energoatom headcount, 2017-2019, employees
2017 2018 2019
Energoatom 34,610 34,295 34,736
Energoatom headcount by category, 2017-2019, employees
Category 2017 2018 2019
Managers 4,831 4,849 4,933
Professionals 7,662 7,749 7,951
Specialists 1,611 1,567 1,582
Technicians 348 323 324
Skilled workers 18,719 18,366 18,503
Basic positions 1,439 1,441 1,443
Energoatom headcount by age, 2017-2019, employees
Age group 2017 2018 2019
Under 35 8,109 7,642 7,468
35-50 14,157 14,398 14,985
50+ 12,344 12,255 12,283
Energoatom headcount by gender, 2017-2019, employees
Gender 2017 2018 2019
Men 23,091 22,807 23,125
Women 11,519 11,488 11,611
Energoatom staff training, 2017, man-courses
Subdivision Primary occupational training Retraining Special training Upskilling Total for 2017
Zaporizhzhya NPP 348 183 10,468 10,434 21,433
Rivne NPP 819 77 17,845 10,934 29,675
South-Ukraine NPP 473 157 5,520 8,221 14,371
Khmelnytska NPP 497 68 12,462 6,297 19,324
AtomRemontService 58 26 2,629 248 2,961
Head Office - - - 236 236
Total 2,195 511 48,924 36,370 88,000
Energoatom staff training, 2018, man-courses
Subdivision Primary occupational training Retraining Special training Upskilling Total for 2018
Zaporizhzhya NPP 810 150 12,343 8,881 22,184
Rivne NPP 1,010 58 16,882 15,251 33,201
South-Ukraine NPP 374 146 5,477 9,658 15,655
Khmelnytska NPP 566 80 13,444 6,813 20,903
AtomRemontService 67 0 2,933 182 3,182
Head Office - - - 277 277
Total 2,827 434 51,079 41,062 95,402
Energoatom staff training, 2019, man-courses
Subdivision Primary occupational training Retraining Special training Upskilling Total for 2019
Zaporizhzhya NPP 891 441 11,875 11,378 24,585
Rivne NPP 880 474 16,849 10,705 28,908
South-Ukraine NPP 459 200 6,522 9,757 16,938
Khmelnytska NPP 586 75 13,087 9,083 22,831
AtomRemontService 59 0 2,908 312 3,279
Head Office - - - 292 292
Total 2,875 1,190 51,241 41,527 96,833
Energoatom staff training pattern, 2017-2019, man-courses
Training provider 2017 2018 2019
Training centres 59,180 60,456 65,448
Other units at NPPs 25,372 30,348 26,604
Third-party providers 3,448 4,598 4,781
Total 88,000 95,402 96,833
Number of students studying under trilateral agreements, 2017-2019
Educational establishment 2017 2018 2019
Odessa National Polytechnic University 108 132 114
Igor Sikorsky Kyiv Polytechnic Institute 61 71 60
Vinnytsia National Technical University 16 20 15
Lviv Polytechnic National University 8 9 11
Zaporizhzhia National Technical University 12 12 9
Ukrainian State University of Chemical Technology 2 1 1
Number of students who completed internships at Energoatom in 2017–2019
Educational establishment 2017 2018 2019
total industrial placement pregraduation internship total industrial placement pregraduation internship total industrial placement pregraduation internship
Total from universities, in particular: 294 99 195 342 167 175 366 234 132
Igor Sikorsky Kyiv Polytechnic Institute 58 1 57 69 1 68 47 2 45
Odessa National Polytechnic University 120 48 72 105 56 49 70 45 25
Lviv Polytechnic National University 29 16 13 51 31 20 38 6 32
Vinnytsia National Technical University 14 6 8 6 2 4 7 3 4
Kharkiv Polytechnic Institute 2 0 2 2 0 2 2 0 2
Zaporizhzhya National Technical University 14 1 13 14 6 8 16 8 8
other universities 57 27 30 92 70 22 186 170 16
Students of vocational schools, colleges, and lyceums 382 265 117 426 396 30 184 116 68
including vocational schools of Rivne NPP 145 75 70 158 143 15 61 40 21
Total 676 364 312 768 563 205 611 390 221
Handling employee queries at Energoatom, 2017-2019
Reason 2017 2018 2019
Housing and accommodation 107 68 181
HR issues 1,085 1,239 455
Financial aid 1,984 1,997 1,775
Other issues 601 859 725
Total 3,777 4,163 3,136
Environmental Protection
Energoatom air emissions, 2017-2019, tonnes
NPP Gross NOx emissions Gross SOx emissions Gross particulate emissions Gross CO emissions Gross emissions of non-methane volatile organic compounds
2017 2018 2019 2017 2018 2019 2017 2018 2019 2017 2018 2019 2017 2018 2019
Zaporizhzhya NPP 5.58 6.09 6.32 0.36 1.58 1.29 3.90 4.17 6.64 2.81 1.25 2.70 4.00 18.38 21.36
Rivne NPP 8.58 8.35 4.74 1.51 0.82 1.24 2.24 2.25 1.80 3.36 3.26 3.94 18.81 23.44 23.36
South-Ukraine NPP 6.09 7.09 5.45 1.04 2.34 0.93 11.25 11.13 11.00 8.92 9.81 8.44 110.06 59.78 9.23
Khmelnytska NPP 2.71 6.50 4.85 0.46 33.84 1.08 6.97 6.45 4.09 7.03 7.46 7.22 5.54 6.20 6.92
Total 22.96 28.03 21.36 3.37 38.58 4.55 24.36 24.00 23.52 22.12 21.78 22.31 138.41 107.80 60.85
Total air emissions, 2017-2019, tonnes
Subdivision 2017 2018 2019
Zaporizhzhya NPP 16.66 31.52 29.78
Rivne NPP 34.79 38.34 35.38
South-Ukraine NPP 137.70 90.66 35.43
Khmelnytska NPP 40.86 75.83 36.15
Total 230.01 236.35 136.74
Energoatom use of potable and service water, 2017-2019, ‘000 m3
Subdivision Water source 2017 2018 2019
Zaporizhzhya NPP Artesian water 834*/709** 700.4*/573.2** 750.3*/ 731.6**
TPP's channel (Dnipro River) 343,086 339,182.2*/** 307,480.4*/**
Rivne NPP Water well in Ostriv village 1,607+/590** 1,613.2*/589.3** 1,562.9*/1,487.5**
Styr River 58,493 49,845.1 58,653.4
South-Ukraine NPP Tap water 517*/** 591.4*/** 493.6*/**
Southern Buh River 54,068 60,373.4*/** 63,087.1*/**
Khmelnytska NPP Potable water 1,246*/1,031** 1,281.4*/1,072.8** 2,999.1*/2,782.3**
Hnyly Rih River, Horyn River 37,673*/** 18,340*/** 14,486.2*/**
Total Potable water 4,211*/2,847** 4,186.4*/2,826.7** 5,805.9*/5,495.0**
Service water 493,320 450,556.7 443,707.0

Note
* – total volume taken from natural sources, including water losses during transportation to satellite localities (which losses are attributed to NPPs’ expenses)
** – used directly on production sites of NPPs
+ – total volumes taken from artesian water wells

Water use at NPPs, 2017-2019, ‘000 m3
Indicator 2017 2018 2019
Ліміт 881,956 881,956 881,956
Water actually taken 509,176 476,341 459,775
Non-radioactive waste, 2017-2019, tonnes
Indicator 2017 2018 2019
Non-radioactive waste generation 41,915 65,727 49,185
Radioactive waste, 2017-2019, tonnes
Indicator 2017 2018 2019
Liquid radioactive waste (LRW) 1,512 1,549 1,566
Solid radioactive waste (SRW) 1,321 1,287 1,423
Ozone depleting substances used at Energoatom facilities, 2017-2019, kg
Subdivision Substance Quantity Note
2017 2018 2019
Zaporizhzhya NPP Chlorofluorcarbons: Dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC 12) 207.79 212.35 173.2 Freon R12
Hydro chlorofluorcarbons: R-22 7,684.94 6,061.49 5,887.22 Freon R22
Rivne NPP Dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC 12) 84.92 67.40 30.5 Freon R12
Chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC 22) 2,650.56 1,221.06 205.0 Freon R22
HFC 134а 13.40 28.40 131.8
South-Ukraine NPP Chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC 22); 35 kg/pc. 7,763.20 7,582.30 46.7 Freon R22
Khmelnytska NPP Chlorofluorcarbons: R-12 56.01 33.49 1.55 Freon R12
Hydro chlorofluorcarbons: R-22 1,221.47 1,222.04 105.82 Freon R22
Total 19,682.29 16,428.53 6,581.79
Average individual radiation dose for personnel in 2019, mSv
Subdivision Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2019
Zaporizhzhya NPP 0.111 0.211 0.164 0.211 0.64
Rivne NPP 0.31 0.13 0.08 0.02 0.47
Khmelnytska NPP 0.198 0.103 0.066 0.197 0.482
South-Ukraine NPP 0.032 0.44 0.28 0.27 0.88
Health and Safety
Occupational injuries at Energoatom, 2017–2019
Total Incl. fatalities
2017 2018 2019 2017 2018 2019
4 7 5 0 0 0
Lost time accident frequency rate at Energoatom, 2017–2019
2017 2018 2019
0.12 0.2 0.2
Energoatom H&S expenses, 2017-2019, UAH million
Year 2017 2018 2019
Expenses 327.8 399.3 464.9

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